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Sunday, 1 June 2014

Duanwu Greetings

It's the time of the year where rice dumplings are abound.  The Chinese make and eat rice dumplings during this time of the year to celebrate Duanwu festival which falls on June 2.  

After successfully making some dumplings last year under my mil's tutelage, i attempted it on my own this year.   I chose to make the classic flavor which is the savory meat dumplings together with mushroom, dried chestnuts, kidney beans and roast pork.

The recipe is largely adapted from Kitchen Tigress.  Her recipe gave me some guidance in terms of the amount needed for each ingredient and I like her idea of mixing fried shallots into the fillings and rice.  I added in some other ingredients and also used a pressure cooker for the cooking.  Do hop over to her space for details and step by step instructions.  She has a video which will guide you on the wrapping which is the most challenging part.


Happy Duanwu and Happy Feasting!
Recipe
Adapted From : Kitchen Tigress

Ingredients
  • 50 pieces of bamboo leaves, soak in water for at least 3 hours, wipe clean and rinse thoroughly then boiled in a pot of water until leaves soften
  • 25 hemp strings, soak in water together with bamboo leaves
  • 120 ml vegetable oil
  • 200g shallots peel, rinse and slice thinly
  • 70g dried prawns, rinse and soak in water to soften
  • 70g Chinese dried mushrooms (about 10 stalks), rinse and soak in water until rehydrated; squeeze dry, reserving liquid, slice
  • 50 dried chestnuts (about 200 g), rinse and soak in water, remove peel and trim of black spots if any
  • 500 g pork belly, rinse and cut into 1 inch piece
  • 150g black eye beans, rinse and soak in water to soften
  • 25 pieces of 2 inch piece roast pork
  • 2 tbsp oyster sauce
  • 4 tbsp light soya sauce
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp sugar
  • 1 tbsp dark soya sauce
Rice
  • 1 kg long-grain glutinous rice -wash and rinse rice with water until water runs clear then soak for 1 hour
  • 3-4 tbsp light soya sauce
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp ground white pepper
  • 1/2 tsp sugar
Method

To prepare the filling
  1. Fry shallots in vegetable oil over medium flame until lightly golden. Turn off heat and let the shallots turn golden brown in residual heat.  Remove shallots and drain on kitchen towel. Set aside half the amount of oil.
  2. Heat up the oil that is left in the wok then fry dried prawns until it is lightly golden and fragrant.
  3. Add mushrooms and mix well. 
  4. Add chestnuts and mix well until chestnut turns to a darker shade.
  5. Add black eye beans and stir well.
  6. Add pork and stir-fry till slightly brown. 
  7. Season with oyster sauce, light soya sauce, salt and sugar.
  8. Drizzle with water drained from dried prawns and mushroom (around 100ml) and in 2-3 batches allowing water to absorb each time before adding the next batch. 
  9. Add dark soya sauce and ground white pepper. Stir through. 
  10. Taste a small piece of pork.  It should be cooked and taste slightly more salty than normal as the seasonings will thin out when the dumplings are boiled in water.  Adjust seasoning if necessary. Transfer to a bowl. 
  11. Add half of fried shallots. Stir till evenly mixed.
To prepare rice
  1. Drain rice.
  2. Place remaining shallot oil in a clean wok and heat till just smoking. 
  3. Add glutinous rice, then remaining fried shallots. Stir till thoroughly heated. 
  4. Season with light soya sauce, salt, sugar and ground white pepper. Stir till well mixed. 
  5. Taste (but do not eat because rice is still raw) and adjust seasoning if necessary. Rice should be a bit saltier than usual as the seasonings will thin out when the dumplings are boiled in water.
  6. Transfer to a bowl.
To assemble the dumplings
  1. Overlap 2 bamboo leaves lengthways then fold into a cone. 
  2. Fill in this order into the cone - 2 tbsp glutinous rice,  5 tbsp fillings, a piece of roast pork and 2-3 tbsp glutinous rice.  Press down to compress the dumpling. Wrap into a pyramid shape. Tie tightly with hemp string to secure. Repeat until all the ingredients are used up.
  3. Put the dumplings in a pressure cooker and immerse completely in water.  Set to pressurize for 45 minutes.

18 comments:

These look mouthwatering!

I really do loves to eat dumpling but only if I know how to wrap it up. This is the only thing that hinder me to make it at home. It is so costly to buy this at the shop nowadays and some does not suit to my taste.

@Mel: Do give it a try, i am sure you can do it! After awhile you will get the hang of it :)

Woah, those are making me hungry right now! I've never had anything like those, but they sound delicious. Will have to try it sometime! :)

That's droolworthy! Wish I could have a bite!

Happy Duanwu! Your mouthwatering dumpling photo makes me regretful for not having more this year.

@June: Thank you! These are chinese classics, i hope you will like them if you get to try :)

@Angie: I wish i could share one with you :)

@Yen: It's never to late to have more ;-)

Oh my goodness! Your Bak Chang looks superb! I haven't had any (soobbss....) because my aunt is not around to make them. As for me, I failed miserably in the wrapping department ha...ha...

Your dumpling looks so delicious. What a pity that I can't and don't know how to wrap this traditional goodie:(

@Phong Hong: I wish we were staying nearby, i would be glad to share some with you :)

@Sokehah: Thank you! Give it a try, it's not too difficult :)

LHB, your bak chang is with black eye beans, it looks yummy!
Just a note on your bamboo leaves washing, if you soak it overnight you will see the different in the water...mine one drain out dark brown water, that's why I always leave it overnight and boiled it in salt before clean every single leaves.

This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

LHB, your bak chang is with black eye beans, it looks yummy!
Just a note on your bamboo leaves washing, if you soak it overnight you will see the different in the water...mine one drain out dark brown water, that's why I always leave it overnight and boiled it in salt before clean every single leaves.

@Tze: Oh dear, i didn't realise i left the step of boiling the leaves out until you mentioned it! I did boiled it otherwise it will be too hard for wrapping, perhaps i didn't do it as long as yours hence the leaves are a lighter shade. The other possibility is maybe it's because i used the pressure cooker to cook it so the changs are left in boiling water for a shorter time. Thanks for highlighting the difference :)

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